Mental health and wellbeing in the lead up to the Voice to Parliament Referendum

Series of fact sheets available.

Date published:

The Department of Health and Aged Care commissioned the National Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing Research (NCATSIWR) at the Australian National University (ANU) to conduct Aboriginal-led research on the mental health and wellbeing concerns Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples might be experiencing in the lead up to the Voice to Parliament Referendum.

This research indicates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may be experiencing extra sources of stress, including uncertainty, increased racism, re-traumatisation, as well as pressure to educate others, especially non-Indigenous Australians, about the Referendum. 

ANU has published evidence-based factsheets that summarise the research findings and provide links to relevant information and supports. These factsheets have been tailored to the following audiences:

  1. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  2. Non-Indigenous people
  3. Service providers supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  4. Organisations
  5. Education sector

Read more:  Mental health and wellbeing in the lead up to the Voice to Parliament Referendum | National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (anu.edu.au)

Tags:
  • Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island health
  • Governance

Acknowledgement of Country

The Commission acknowledges the traditional custodians of the lands throughout Australia.
We pay our respects to their clans, and to the elders, past present and emerging, and acknowledge their continuing connection to land, sea and community.

Diversity

The Commission is committed to embracing diversity and eliminating all forms of discrimination in the provision of health services. The Commission welcomes all people irrespective of ethnicity, lifestyle choice, faith, sexual orientation and gender identity.

Lived Experience

We acknowledge the individual and collective contributions of those with a lived and living experience of mental ill-health and suicide, and those who love, have loved and care for them. Each person’s journey is unique and a valued contribution to Australia’s commitment to mental health suicide prevention systems reform.